20 March, 2010

Transformations in the Heartland: Life and Race in Oshkosh

Posted by Socrates in dispossession & destruction, Diversity, diversity is hate, General Decline, genocide by jew, genocide of White culture, Socrates at 1:54 pm | Permanent Link

by Simon Krejsa.

“Oshkosh is a city in East-Central Wisconsin, celebrated on websites as “Oshkosh on the Water” with pictures of lakes Winnebago and Butte des Morts, a college-town that is home to the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and its 11–12 thousand students. The city is most famous or best known for the EAA, the Experimental Aircraft Association, whose week-long “fly-in” each summer attracts 200,000 to 300,000 enthusiasts and other attendees, many of them from other nations. In bars and stores and restaurants, I’ve heard Australian, English, Irish, German, and French accents. I moved to Oshkosh in June of 2005 and also lived there for a few years during the 1970s and 80s.”

[Article].


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  7. 12 Responses to “Transformations in the Heartland: Life and Race in Oshkosh”

    1. Andrei's ghost Says:

      Tea party protesters hurl racial insults at Georgia Rep. John Lewis…
      By William Douglas

      WASHINGTON – Demonstrators outside the U.S. Capitol, angry over the proposed health-care reform bill, shouted “nigger” Saturday at U.S. Rep. John Lewis, a Georgia congressman and civil rights icon who was nearly beaten to death during an Alabama march in the 1960s.

      The protesters also shouted obscenities at other members of the Congressional Black Caucus, lawmakers said.

      Capitol Police escorted the members of Congress into the Capitol after the confrontation. At least one demonstrator was reported arrested.

      “They were shouting, sort of harassing,” Lewis said. “But, it’s OK, I’ve faced this before. It reminded me of the ’60s. It was a lot of downright hate and anger and people being downright mean.”

      Lewis said he was leaving the Cannon office building across from the Capitol when protesters shouted “Kill the bill, kill the bill,” Lewis said.

      “I said ‘I’m for the bill, I support the bill, I’m voting for the bill,’ ” Lewis said.

      A colleague who was accompanying Lewis said people in the crowd responded by saying “Kill the bill, then the n-word.”

      “It surprised me that people are so mean and we can’t engage in a civil dialogue and debate,” Lewis said.

      Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, D-Mo., said he was a few yards behind Lewis and distinctly heard “nigger.”

      “It was a chorus,” Cleaver said. “In a way, I feel sorry for those people who are doing this nasty stuff – they’re being whipped up. I decided I wouldn’t be angry with any of them.”

      Cleaver’s office said later in a statement that he’d also been spat upon and that Capitol Police had arrested his assailant. The statement praised the police, who Cleaver said escorted the members of Congress into the Capitol past the demonstrators.

      “The man who spat on the congressman was arrested, but the congressman has chosen not to press charges,” the statement said.

      “This is not the first time the congressman has been called the ‘n’ word and certainly not the worst assault he has endured in his years fighting for equal rights for all Americans,” the statement said. “That being said, he is disappointed that in the 21st century our national discourse has devolved to the point of name-calling and spitting.”

      Protestors also used a slur as they confronted Rep. Barney Frank (Jew), D-Mass., an openly gay member of Congress. A writer for Huffington Post said the crowd called Frank a “faggot.”

      Frank told the Boston Globe that the incident happened as he was walking from the Longworth House office building to the Rayburn House office building, both a short distance from the Capitol. Frank said the crowd consisted of a couple hundred of people and that they referred to him as “homo.”

      “I’m disappointed with the unwillingness to be civil,” Frank told the Globe. “I was, I guess, surprised by the rancor. What it means is obviously the health-care bill is proxy for a lot of other sentiments, some of which are perfectly reasonable, but some of which are not.”

      “People out there today, on the whole, were really hateful,” Frank said. “The leaders of this movement have a responsibility to speak out more.”

      Thousands of demonstrators gathered outside the Capitol on Saturday as the House Democratic leadership worked to gather enough votes to enact a health-care overhaul proposal that has become the centerpiece of President Barack Obama’s domestic agenda. Most were affiliated with so-called tea party organizations that originally sprang up during last summer’s protests of the health-care proposals.

      Heated debate has surrounded what role race plays in the motivations of the tea party demonstrators. During protests last summer, demonstrators displayed a poster depicting Obama as an African witch doctor complete with headdress, above the words “OBAMACARE coming to a clinic near you.” Former President Jimmy Carter asserted in September that racism was a major factor behind the hostility that Obama’s proposals had faced.

      The claim brought angry rebuttals from Republicans.

      On Saturday, Frank, however, said he was sorry Republican leaders didn’t do more to disown the protesters.

      Some Republicans “think they are benefiting from this rancor,” he said.

      House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C., said Saturday’s ugliness underscored for him that the health-care overhaul isn’t the only motivation for many protesters.

      “I heard people saying things today I’ve not heard since March 15th, 1960, when I was marching to try and get off the back of the bus,” Clyburn said. “This is incredible, shocking to me.”

      He added, “A lot of us have said for a long time that none of this is about health care at all. It’s about extending a basic fundamental right to people who are less powerful.”

      (McClatchy’s James Rosen contributed to this report.)

      (c) 2010, McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

      Visit the McClatchy Washington Bureau on the World Wide Web at http://www.mcclatchydc.com.

      For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA.
      By William Douglas

      WASHINGTON – Demonstrators outside the U.S. Capitol, angry over the proposed health-care reform bill, shouted “nigger” Saturday at U.S. Rep. John Lewis, a Georgia congressman and civil rights icon who was nearly beaten to death during an Alabama march in the 1960s.

      The protesters also shouted obscenities at other members of the Congressional Black Caucus, lawmakers said.

      Capitol Police escorted the members of Congress into the Capitol after the confrontation. At least one demonstrator was reported arrested.

      “They were shouting, sort of harassing,” Lewis said. “But, it’s OK, I’ve faced this before. It reminded me of the ’60s. It was a lot of downright hate and anger and people being downright mean.”

      Lewis said he was leaving the Cannon office building across from the Capitol when protesters shouted “Kill the bill, kill the bill,” Lewis said.

      “I said ‘I’m for the bill, I support the bill, I’m voting for the bill,’ ” Lewis said.

      A colleague who was accompanying Lewis said people in the crowd responded by saying “Kill the bill, then the n-word.”

      “It surprised me that people are so mean and we can’t engage in a civil dialogue and debate,” Lewis said.

      Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, D-Mo., said he was a few yards behind Lewis and distinctly heard “nigger.”

      “It was a chorus,” Cleaver said. “In a way, I feel sorry for those people who are doing this nasty stuff – they’re being whipped up. I decided I wouldn’t be angry with any of them.”

      Cleaver’s office said later in a statement that he’d also been spat upon and that Capitol Police had arrested his assailant. The statement praised the police, who Cleaver said escorted the members of Congress into the Capitol past the demonstrators.

      “The man who spat on the congressman was arrested, but the congressman has chosen not to press charges,” the statement said.

      “This is not the first time the congressman has been called the ‘n’ word and certainly not the worst assault he has endured in his years fighting for equal rights for all Americans,” the statement said. “That being said, he is disappointed that in the 21st century our national discourse has devolved to the point of name-calling and spitting.”

      Protestors also used a slur as they confronted Rep. Barney Frank (Jew), D-Mass., an openly gay member of Congress. A writer for Huffington Post said the crowd called Frank a “faggot.”

      Frank told the Boston Globe that the incident happened as he was walking from the Longworth House office building to the Rayburn House office building, both a short distance from the Capitol. Frank said the crowd consisted of a couple hundred of people and that they referred to him as “homo.”

      “I’m disappointed with the unwillingness to be civil,” Frank told the Globe. “I was, I guess, surprised by the rancor. What it means is obviously the health-care bill is proxy for a lot of other sentiments, some of which are perfectly reasonable, but some of which are not.”

      “People out there today, on the whole, were really hateful,” Frank said. “The leaders of this movement have a responsibility to speak out more.”

      Thousands of demonstrators gathered outside the Capitol on Saturday as the House Democratic leadership worked to gather enough votes to enact a health-care overhaul proposal that has become the centerpiece of President Barack Obama’s domestic agenda. Most were affiliated with so-called tea party organizations that originally sprang up during last summer’s protests of the health-care proposals.

      Heated debate has surrounded what role race plays in the motivations of the tea party demonstrators. During protests last summer, demonstrators displayed a poster depicting Obama as an African witch doctor complete with headdress, above the words “OBAMACARE coming to a clinic near you.” Former President Jimmy Carter asserted in September that racism was a major factor behind the hostility that Obama’s proposals had faced.

      The claim brought angry rebuttals from Republicans.

      On Saturday, Frank, however, said he was sorry Republican leaders didn’t do more to disown the protesters.

      Some Republicans “think they are benefiting from this rancor,” he said.

      House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C., said Saturday’s ugliness underscored for him that the health-care overhaul isn’t the only motivation for many protesters.

      “I heard people saying things today I’ve not heard since March 15th, 1960, when I was marching to try and get off the back of the bus,” Clyburn said. “This is incredible, shocking to me.”

      He added, “A lot of us have said for a long time that none of this is about health care at all. It’s about extending a basic fundamental right to people who are less powerful.”

      (McClatchy’s James Rosen contributed to this report.)

      (c) 2010, McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

      Visit the McClatchy Washington Bureau on the World Wide Web at http://www.mcclatchydc.com.

      For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA.

    2. Ein Says:

      I enjoyed this article. It’s well written, objective not hysterical, and I can identify with it. I’ve been in Oshkosh various times (though not lately), and I recognize the things he’s talking about. Oshkosh is a nice old middle-sized American city, a remnant of another era, that exhibits the malaise that many cities do (though not the racial crisis) — a dead downtown, closed industries, and flourishing shopping malls of discount big-box stores outside the city limits. It’s a total reversal of the old pattern. At one time, when we were kids, people went downtown to shop. Now, downtown is all shuttered up and you have to go OUT of the city to shop. Most of these shopping malls (and the chain stores in them) are Jewish owned, while shuttered-up downtown represents “old money” that dried up faced with the shopping mall challenge. The Jewish suburban malls are the new downtowns.

      There was a downtown mall, an attempt by the city to attract business back, which was a flop. It closed several years ago. The Hilton hotel, where I stayed nearby, no longer exists either. I have stood out in the middle of Main Street (very near the picture shown) and saw no traffic or a single human being in either direction! Dead! There was at least a Walgreen’s store downtoen where you could get something if you needed it. Last time I was there, I couldn’t find it. Then I realized why I couldn’t find it — it was gone; it had been razed and is now an empty lot!

      I wasn’t aware of any racial problems (because there were no “races” — a pleasant aspect of Oshkosh), but they’re no doubt catching up with Oshkosh too, as they with every place. I don’t know what would attract them there, unless it’s the welfare. What else do they have? About the only thing operating there now is the University. I suppose that’s the main industry now. Oshkosh used to be a bustling industrial town, but that was another age, and long before I knew it.

      It might be a quiet, safe place to retire, for someone elderly and poor, as the writer seems to have in mind for himself. But that could have its problems too — as I said, all the shopping is out beyond the outskirts, along the Interstate. You need a car, or you’re trapped. No bus service on weekends, or after 5PM. Not too convenient, I’d say, for someone without a car.

      I liked Oshkosh. Nothing much to do there, though. I was interested in visiting historical sites (the early French explorers all passed this way, as it was on the water route: St. Lawrence to Mississippi). Btw, Professor MacDonald is from Oshkosh. It’s easier to understand him and his outlook, knowing he grew up in a quiet, safe, all-white, all-American town like this. I wonder if he ever gets back there… I wonder what he thinks of it now?

    3. Igor Alexander Says:

      “About the only thing operating there now is the University.”

      You’d think that with a university, there would at least be a local grocery store, a convenience store, a gas station, and a couple of bars and restaurants.

    4. Tim McGreen Says:

      The suburbs are not safe from the Black Plague, either. The Blacks have ruined the older suburban communities just outside of Chicago and St. Louis. That large dead suburban mall in Harvey, IL stands as a symbol of what happens whenever the niggers show up in large numbers.

    5. Andrei's ghost Says:

      German nudist sentenced for swastika tattoo

      By Andrei Yustschinsky. Director of Wolf Lake Nudist Park in Hammond, Indiana

      A 19-year-old German male nudist has been given a one-year suspended sentence after bearing a swastika tattoo on his ass in public, a court spokesman said on Friday.

      The man, a nudist, who has not been named, stripped off last summer at a lake between Berlin and Hanover and other nudist swimmers and sunbathers present made an official complaint, Wetzlar court spokesman Amin Lauber-Noell told AFP.

      “He claimed that part of his ass was covered up with a plaster and that this fell off. Whether that’s accurate or not is another question,” he said.

      The public display of Nazi symbols like the swastika have been banned in Germany since World War II. People are allowed to have tattoos, but only if the symbols are not seen in public.

      “That means that if you have a swastika, you are not allowed to walk around naked,” the 28 year old holocaust survivor Lauber-Noell said. The trial took place on Thursday.

      Andrei Yustschinsky reporting from the Wolf Lake Nudist Park in Hammond, Indiana…

    6. Ein Says:

      “You’d think that with a university, there would at least be a local grocery store, a convenience store, a gas station, and a couple of bars and restaurants.”

      Oh, I’m sure there are small places like that, out near the university. And fast food joints, of course, wherever college kids are found. But I was thinking in terms of major employers.

      And the closest supermarket was quite a ways out from downtown, not walkable. There is NOTHING downtown.

      Old folks would have to take a bus “out of town” to go shopping; and they would have to get it all done before 5PM.

    7. th Says:

      It happens in communities throughout this bed pan of a nation. Aryans build and niggers come. Its an ironic situation, because many niggers are fleeing the plight that they themselves have created. Niggers get tired of other niggers and move to white areas thinking it will be better. As natural as flowers in the spring so will nigger squalor, crime and bedlam soon follow the migrant nigger. All newer neighborhoods start out as white communities, but within 5 years the first nigger will come, thanks HUD, within 10 years it will be half nigger and then whitey has to move. Mexican don’t seem to follow whitey from the city to the suburbs, these shitbags seem to want to live where no one else will. The filth that these sub humans are able to create is unexplainable. The only solution for the aryan man is to move far into the country side and begin learning to speak Estonian. Its only going to get worse. Where ever you live niggers are coming.

    8. Kuda Bux Says:

      What in h is happening to our language? Words are being split that should be one word. In the last few minutes I saw within as with in, and (above) countryside as country side. It seems to be wide spread and growing fast.

    9. Tim McGreen Says:

      Well, at least no one here is guilty of using any split infinitives. Such grammatical constructions are likely to truly drive me crazy.

    10. Henry Says:

      I can think of worse.

    11. Tim McGreen Says:

      You can think of worse what?

    12. Howdy Doody Says:

      General Douglas MacArthur
      Address to the Joint Meeting of the U. S. Congress
      April 19, 1951
      Washington D. C.

      Listen.

      YouTube- Douglas MacArthur – Address to Congress (1951) Part 3 of 4

      Part 4

      YouTube- Douglas MacArthur – Address to Congress (1951) Part 4 of 4