5 April, 2006

Cashier the Casseurs

Posted by alex in Alex Linder, France, immigration, jewed immigration policy at 4:44 pm | Permanent Link

[People of urinal wreck France, to the delight of the jews who admitted them in the first place. Is this happening in your country?]

The police and independent analysts say that most of the vandalism and violence that has marred the protests has been by young men, largely immigrants or the children of immigrants, from tough, underprivileged suburbs, who roam in groups and have little else to keep them busy.

Note to editors: Dare not say “North African”. Employ the euphemism “underprivileged”.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1607807/posts

Paris ‘smashers’ shift attacks from property to people
Scotland on Sunday ^ | April 2, 2006 | RUTH FREMSON

THE images are unnerving: hooded, swift-footed youths infiltrating protest rallies in the heart of tourist Paris, smashing shop windows, setting cars on fire, beating and robbing passers-by and throwing objects at the riot police.

They are called the casseurs – the smashers. With more marches planned for this week as part of a continuing protest over a new jobs law, the casseurs are the volatile chemical that could ignite an even bigger crisis for the government than the impasse over the law itself.

They create primarily a law-and-order problem, evoking the rioting that gripped the troubled suburbs of French cities for weeks last autumn. Pumped up by news coverage, these youths boast of trying to steal mobile phones and money and vow to take revenge for the daily humiliation they say they endure from the police.

But the casseurs create an image problem as well, as striking television images and photographs of youths, some of them masked, and the police using tear gas and water cannons, give the impression of a Paris under siege. ‘Don’t Go to Paris,’ read a headline in the Sun last week.

In live coverage of the mass protests in Paris, CNN compared the protests to the 1989 Tiananmen Square uprising in Beijing. What worries the authorities now is that the targets of anger are shifting, moving beyond attacks on property to attacks on people as well.

“I am deeply worried because we are seeing an unleashing of violence by 2,000 to 3,000 thugs who come to smash and loot,” said embattled interior minister Nicolas Sarkozy. “My objective is to avoid mistakes by the police, so that people can protest in safety.”

The police and independent analysts say that most of the vandalism and violence that has marred the protests has been by young men, largely immigrants or the children of immigrants, from tough, underprivileged suburbs, who roam in groups and have little else to keep them busy.

“In France, we always imagine violence to be political because of our revolutions, but this isn’t the case,” said Sebastian Roché, a political scientist who specialises in delinquency in the suburbs.

The casseurs are people who are apart from the political protests. Their movement is apolitical. It is about banal violence – thefts, muggings, aggression.”

The casseur phenomenon is revisiting old and disturbing ground. During student protests in 1994 over a plan to cut the legal minimum wage for the young, hundreds of youths from the suburbs descended on Paris to attach themselves to peaceful protests and turn their rage against the police.

Many of those youths, identified as coming in from the poor suburbs, battled the police, burned cars and smashed store windows.

In one protest, nearly 50 policemen were injured in five hours of violence.

In another incident, a television cameraman was beaten and kicked so badly as he filmed a gang of casseurs that he suffered a fractured skull.

In the current protests, the technology of mobile phones makes it easier for the roving bands of youths to coordinate their actions and warn one another about police movements.

Some of the youths even share instant war trophies: photographs and short scenes of violence and vandalism they have captured on their mobile phones.

The police have so far been using restraint, trying to avoid what is called the Malik Oussekine syndrome. Malik Oussekine was a 22-year-old student protester who died after being beaten by the police during a mass demonstration in 1986 to protest a proposal to give universities more autonomy in student selection.

President Jacques Chirac, who was prime minister at the time, withdrew the initiative; the education minister was forced to resign.


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  7. 6 Responses to “Cashier the Casseurs

    1. Carpenter Says:

      Heard from a guy whose son went to Paris last week. He says the communists love this: when they can’t take over a country, at least they can use demonstrations to destroy as much of it as possible. Leftist extremists join the muds in beating up any middle-class Frenchman they can get their hands on. They share the same criminal mindset.

      In 1968, they did the same thing, remember: leftist students (students don’t have to work, therefore have time on their hands for riots), led by a Jewish communist called Daniel “the Bandit,” rioted in Paris under the pretext of demanding some changes on campus, like housing men and women in the same dorms. The labor unions decided this was a good opportunity to go on strike for some changes they wanted, and the communist parties went out in the streets hoping they could take over the country. (Sounds far-fetched? This was in 1968, remember, during the Cold War when commies really believed they could impose dictatorships all over Western Europe.)

      After a few days Charles de Gaulle went on the radio to urge normal Parisians to take to the streets. It turned out they were at least five times as many, waving French flags in the streets the next day in place of the red communist banners of the protesters. The communists were defeated by de Gaulle yet again, like they had been when they hoped to take over France after WWII.

      Cars had been burned all over Paris, stores and banks looted and destroyed. Charles de Gaulle announced new elections, and his party won more than 90 percent of the seats in the Senate. The socialists were completely erased.

      Yet today, the media and school textbooks talk about this as a romantic “protest by the people,” pretend the election never happened, and proclaim victory. “He who controls the present controls the past” reasons the Jew.

    2. Carpenter Says:

      Observe the history distortion:

      The police have so far been using restraint, trying to avoid what is called the Malik Oussekine syndrome. Malik Oussekine was a 22-year-old student protester who died after being beaten by the police during a mass demonstration in 1986 to protest a proposal to give universities more autonomy in student selection.

      President Jacques Chirac, who was prime minister at the time, withdrew the initiative; the education minister was forced to resign.

      No mentioning of how Charles de Gaulle’s speech on the radio put an end to the communist-organized riots, as normal Parisians took to the streets to stop them. No mentioning of the early elections de Gaulle announced, where the socialists and communists were erased and de Gaulle’s party won more than 90 percent of the Senate seats – the most remarkable electoral victory in French history! That is the true story to be told: how patriotic French defeated the extremists who had been looting and beating up Parisians for days.

      Instead, we hear of one rioter who got killed. (How many Parisians were killed after the beatings they received?)

    3. seelow heights Says:

      Back in 1968 the numbers of Muslims and niggers were far, far less than than they are today. Even so , the situation would be salvagable if the French leadership were not as traitorous as the leadership in the US. The Foreign Legion could clean up the mess within 24 hours.

    4. apollonian Says:

      I understand (but forget the exact source at the moment) the Jews had their drug gangs alerted and activated to go burn cars reminding folk how much they’re owed for civil peace, a gesture of the havoc Jews can incite, especially for all the drug-heads, esp. among the non-whites. General terror as diversion. Mexicans intend to do this to us too, hey.

      But a serious rationalizing within Christian movement might well work wonders as general counteraction. Honest elections and death to the Fed. A.

    5. Carpenter Says:

      A lesson to be learned is how important authority is to most people. The law-abiding French are far more numerous than the rabble, and could protect their city like they did in 1968. They are all waiting for a chance. The catalyst for them lies with authority, and they had that in de Gaulle, when he told them to take collective action. They don’t have that today, and so they won’t organize something on their own. Many a Frenchman is eager to bash muds and leftist skulls, but he won’t go out, because he knows his neighbor won’t follow him. His neighbor thinks the same.

    6. Carpenter Says:

      Apparently immigrant gangs also attacked the demonstrators. Good, the lefties need a good beating to have their thinking straightened out. Why gnash your teeth at slightly more flexible employment laws, when your country is being invaded?

      http://www.lewrockwell.com/latulippe/latulippe67.html

      Apparently, loosely organized gangs of Muslim youths were prowling the fringes of these left-wing demonstrations beating student marchers. This was, allegedly, quite widespread and has obvious political ramifications. Specifically, it shows the extent to which Muslim youths are alienated, even from left-wing students who would ordinarily be presumed to be their political allies. The fear of being attacked by these gangs supposedly became widespread among the students and represents a small but notable fissure between the European left and the immigrant gangs.

      While no leaders of the French left have defected to anti-immigrant politics, the memory of being beaten by gangs of hoodlums will remain embedded in the personal memories of the rising generation of French leftists. While this, in and of itself, may be of limited importance, it does represent a trend which I believe will continue.

      If and when prominent European leftists go the “Slobo route,” things will start to move rather quickly.