21 January, 2011

Movie Quote

Posted by Socrates in movies, music, Socrates at 6:20 am | Permanent Link

“Beethoven is upright and honest, whereas jazz is sneaky and treacherous and effeminate and just plain foreign.”

— from the movie “My Life So Far” (1999).


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  7. 23 Responses to “Movie Quote”

    1. Evan Says:

      You meant, movie quotation.

    2. Tim McGreen Says:

      Here’s a good movie quote:

      “The vegetarian-nude-homo nonsense cannot be blamed on the Jews; this happened long before Weimar and the events leading up to it.”

      Bette Davis, All About Eve, 1950

    3. M. Kraus Says:

      Jazz is a dying genre, at least in America. I don’t know what the situation is in Europe. Young Americans aren’t interested in jazz anymore–but they seem to have an insatiable appetite for Hip Hop and R&B.

    4. Tim McGreen Says:

      This obsession with Negroid cannibal music among America’s White youth cannot last forever. Or can it? I think it all began with Run DMC back in 1985. Actually, they were pretty good. Besides, what was the alternative for young White music fans back then, Def Leppard? Quiet Riot? Poison? Uggh.

      The Seattle “grunge” scene of the early to mid 90s was apparently White rock music’s last gasp. Kurt Cobain was the last truly great rock star. Well, him and Axl.

    5. Antagonistes Says:

      “The vegetarian-nude-homo nonsense cannot be blamed on the Jews; this happened long before Weimar and the events leading up to it. However, since I am a homosexual and our Leader is a vegetarian, let’s just limit this conversation to the wierd exhibitionists.”

      This quote is in the new Spielberg movie, “Aliens and Nazis.” It is very much like the Bette Davis quote.

      It is delivered by Ernst Julius Röhm to the aliens, whom he calls “the Aryans of the Cosmos.” He is explaining to the fatherly, Pope-like Venusian leader that there was indeed a small left-leaning segment of Germans who engaged in this weird exhibitionism and who, now that the Party has outlawed it, are blaming their previous behavior on the Jews.

    6. Bigduke6 Says:

      Everyone I have been aquainted with who was really into jazz was a phony, unctious, asshole.

    7. Bigduke6 Says:

      Unctuous, that is. The spelling lobe of my brain housing group needs some WD – 40.

    8. mrcrouton Says:

      Hold up. Al Dimeola did jazz fusion and it kicks ass. There are some good jazz compositions too, but many if not most are deplorable.

      Frank Zappa did a few good jazz tunes. Try out Waka Jawaka (title track) and Night School from Jazz from Hell.

    9. Doug Says:

      Tim McGreen, what’s wrong with Def Leppard? They are wonderful.

    10. Krystian Says:

      Young Americans aren’t interested in jazz anymore–but they seem to have an insatiable appetite for Hip Hop and R&B.

      I find even jazz to be more palatable than that shit. Hip-hop and rnb, quite apart from the obvious flaw of niggerization, is trite, formulaic, brain-burning bubblegum crap which is further worsened by the modern production aesthetic which fairly strips it of any humanity. I cannot even shop much anymore because in every store the hapless consumer is subjected to the same maddening niggerized drivel.

      Destroy it with fire. /rant

    11. Tim McGreen Says:

      Antagonistes, both Ms. Davis and I are looking forward to the new Spielberg epic. I hear Jack Nicholson will play the role of the Venusian Pope. But I thought Ron Howard was directing it?

      Mr. Crouton is right, Frank Zappa was a truly original composer and musician. Hot Rats, Apostrophe and Over-Nite Sensation are all great albums. He was also great in concert. I would have loved to see The Mothers of Invention perform at The Whiskey a Go-Go, circa 1966.

      Doug, I might have agreed with you about “The Leppard” if I was still a pimply-faced kid and it was still 1983. Do they still have that one-armed drummer? Come on, Guns N’ Roses was one of the only really good rock bands that came out of the 80s.

    12. Antagonistes Says:

      Jack Nicholson actually plays the role of the perfidious vegetarian-nude-homo, Diefenbach, and the guy who played Napoleon Dynamite (I forget his name–John something-or-other) plays Fidus, the young lad who Diefenbach buggers.

      One of the funniest moments of this Ron Howard-directed film is when these two vegetarian-nude-homos go before the Venusian “Pope” (actually played by Hugo Weaving) and Ernst Julius Röhm (played by Abe Foxman, who does indeed bear a startling resemblance) and try to blame their (previous) life style on the Jews .

    13. Socrates Says:

      Frank Zappa did a few good jazz tunes. Try out Waka Jawaka (title track) and Night School from Jazz from Hell.

      mrcrouton, I agree, to a point. Zappa has some good albums, e.g., Sheik Yerbooti, Apostrophe, Overnight Sensation, You Are What You Is.

      Weird, but good.

    14. Joe Says:

      I am a Classically trained pianist. I never could understand the allure of “jazz”. I always assumed “it was just a matter of taste”. But, i could never wrap my brain around the ramblings of jazz once exposed to the explicit exactness, precision and exquisite beauty of Bach and Beethoven. I must admit that I admire the musicianship of jazz artists, but their “art” has always eluded me. Nothing they write or play sticks to my ribs (nor memory upon first listening). Only the great European Masters’ works have this effect upon me. Time is the ultimate judge upon what is truly great.

    15. Virgil Says:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-DqeXl0AcI

    16. Virgil Says:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkajXeVLpk4&feature=related

    17. Antagonistes Says:

      Even though I like some jazz I have always had the suspicion that it, originally, was a “fake” music form, a copy of something by those who cannot do the real thing, much like Haitian creole is an inept copy of Parisian French.

      The jazz (or “New Age music” ) that I like is the idea of jazz that has been taken and given style by Whites much like “American Indian art” has been taken by Whites and given style, rhythm, color, value, tension, texture, etc.; or at least the Indians have learned these Western art concepts.

    18. Tim McGreen Says:

      The first Jazz record came out in 1917, during WWI. It’s a subversive Jew/Negro form of music that was designed to make the Kaiser lose the War. This Nazi-era information poster tells it like it is:

      http://www2.lib.virginia.edu/exhibits/censored/images/large/MUSIK.jpg

    19. Antagonistes Says:

      Spot on!

      In the same vein, the current issue of Occidental Quarterly has an article about Francis Parker Yockey, who said that the “jitterbug” dance of the twenties ( or whenever it was) was sensual, mindless negro dancing, led and pushed by jewish bandmasters, in order to debauch Whites.

      Some of the old dances were indeed stiff and pretentious, but we could have come up with something better than jungle rhythmns and soul-train sexual twitches and negro butt-shimmying and titty-boop-a-dooping!

      Actually, square-dancing (some of the costumes are dopey, though) and western dancing can be very enjoyable.

    20. Sean Gruber Says:

      Square dancing was something our gym teacher forced us to do in elementary school.

      I well remember the scratchy records on the old turntable, the smell of dirty socks, and the hot sweaty hands of the little girls with whom we “dosey-doed.”

      Simply sick-making.

      However, what no one wanted to admit (for all us kids professed to despise it) was that it *was* kind of enjoyable, in a way. It felt cool to swing from one set of little hands to the next while the records popped away. But I never want to do anything like that again.

      As to jazz (don’t capitalize it, for fuck’s sake), it’s wallpaper music, something for the background in a bookstore or a bar or in a film to give the thing a certain swanky atmosphere. It isn’t really music, just noise that lends itself to a certain notion of a sophisticated feel.

    21. Howdy Doody Says:

      Joe Says:

      24 January, 2011 at 12:19 am

      I am a Classically trained pianist. I never could understand the allure of “jazz”. I always assumed “it was just a matter of taste”. But, i could never wrap my brain around the ramblings of jazz once exposed to the explicit exactness, precision and exquisite beauty of Bach and Beethoven. I must admit that I admire the musicianship of jazz artists, but their “art” has always eluded me. Nothing they write or play sticks to my ribs (nor memory upon first listening). Only the great European Masters’ works have this effect upon me. Time is the ultimate judge upon what is truly great.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfQ5hOOLk1o

    22. Howdy Doody Says:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsdIkUSjXv8&feature=related

      Michelangeli – Debussy – La Cathedrale engloutie

    23. Tim McGreen Says:

      Wait, there is some jazz that’s worth listening to. What about the Charlie Brown music, composed by Vince Guaraldi? Or Gato Barbieri’s music for Last Tango in Paris? Or Bernard Herman’s music for Taxi Driver? That’s all jazz or jazz-inspired music, you know. Or how about when Chuck Heston is listening to A Summer Place on his 8-track player in his red Ford convertible at the beginning of The Omega Man? I can dig it.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XOIU1SGx7tY